Dave Proctor

Time course of experimentally induced endothelial dysfunction in healthy humans

Project Description: I would like the student to characterize the time course and extent of experimentally induced endothelial dysfunction in healthy humans. Endothelial function will be measured before and at several time points following (30-, 60-, and 120-minutes) acute hemodynamic stimuli previously shown to reduce brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) in healthy adults. The project will compare the time course of FMD attenuation and restoration following two acute hemodynamic stimuli: 1) ischemia re-perfusion injury (induced by 20 minutes of upper arm cuff occlusion and release) and 2) venous distension in the arm (hanging one arm over the side of a bed for 60 minutes). Microvascular responses will also be compared between the experimental and control forearms using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). This project will be conducted in healthy young adults. These studies will establish our ability to experimentally induce and quantify acute reductions in macro- and micro-vascular endothelial function in humans. This will ultimately allow my lab to determine if consumption of nitrate-rich beetroot juice (a nitric oxide boosting therapy) can protect against acute reductions in endothelial function under highly controlled conditions.

About Dr. Proctor »

Summer Translational Cardiovascular Science Institute (STCSI)

Contact Information

  • Keefe Manning, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Surgery
    kbm10@psu.edu
  • Jim Pawelczyk, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor of Physiology and Kinesiology
    jap18@psu.edu

REU Faculty Research Projects

Apply
  • Application deadline is January 29, 2017
 
 

About

The Department of Biomedical Engineering administers the undergraduate major in biomedical engineering, and is a part of the university-wide Intercollege Graduate Degree Program, offering both M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Bioengineering. Our work combines traditional engineering principles with medicine and technology for the betterment of human health and society. 

Department of Biomedical Engineering

205 Hallowell Building

The Pennsylvania State University

University Park, PA 16802-4400

Phone: 814-863-6614